TheSlave Ship: A Human History PDF/EPUB ´ A Human

TheSlave Ship: A Human History The missing link in the chain of American slavery For three centuries slave ships carted millions of people from the coasts of Africa across the Atlantic to the Americas Much is known of the slave trade and the American plantation system, but little of the ships that made it all possibleIn The Slave Ship, award winning historian Marcus Rediker draws on thirty years of research in maritime archives to create an unprecedented history of these vessels and the human drama acted out on their rolling decks He reconstructs in chilling detail the lives, deaths, and terrors of captains, sailors, and the enslaved aboard a floating dungeon trailed by sharksFrom the young African kidnapped from his village and sold into slavery by a neighboring tribe to the would be priest who takes a job as a sailor on a slave ship only to be horrified at the evil he sees to the captain who relishes having a hell of my own, Rediker illuminates the lives of people who were thought to have left no traceThis is a tale of tragedy and terror, but also an epic of resilience, survival, and the creation of something entirely new Marcus Rediker restores the slave ship to its rightful place alongside the plantation as a formative institution of slavery, a place where a profound and still haunting history of race, class, and modern economy was made [PDF / Epub] ☁ Forever Across The Marsh By Jeff Pearson – Lavons.co.uk but little of the ships that made it all possibleIn The Slave Ship ❮Download❯ ➹ The Russians Tender Lover (The Sisterhood, Author Elizabeth Lennox – Lavons.co.uk award winning historian Marcus Rediker draws on thirty years of research in maritime archives to create an unprecedented history of these vessels and the human drama acted out on their rolling decks He reconstructs in chilling detail the lives [Download] ➼ Cross on Evidence Author Rupert Cross – Lavons.co.uk deaths ❴PDF❵ ❤ The Comics Journal Author Gary Groth – Lavons.co.uk and terrors of captains ➹ [Download] ➵ Betty the Yeti By Jon Klein ➼ – Lavons.co.uk sailors [BOOKS] ✸ Ramadan and Id Al-Fitr By Dianne M. MacMillan – Lavons.co.uk and the enslaved aboard a floating dungeon trailed by sharksFrom the young African kidnapped from his village and sold into slavery by a neighboring tribe to the would be priest who takes a job as a sailor on a slave ship only to be horrified at the evil he sees to the captain who relishes having a hell of my own ❰BOOKS❯ ✯ The Rocker That Uses Me Author Terri Anne Browning – Lavons.co.uk Rediker illuminates the lives of people who were thought to have left no traceThis is a tale of tragedy and terror ➺ [Reading] ➼ Ellie and the Harpmaker By Hazel Prior ➯ – Lavons.co.uk but also an epic of resilience ❴Read❵ ➮ Nyx Author Joe Quesada – Lavons.co.uk survival [Download] ➺ From the Eyes of a Child (There Were No Parents Here, 1) ➿ Janice Higgins – Lavons.co.uk and the creation of something entirely new Marcus Rediker restores the slave ship to its rightful place alongside the plantation as a formative institution of slavery [Epub] ➜ Finale (Caraval, ➝ Stephanie Garber – Lavons.co.uk a place where a profound and still haunting history of race [PDF / Epub] ☀ Biological Anthropology: The Natural History of Humankind (4th Edition) By Craig Stanford – Lavons.co.uk class [PDF / Epub] ✅ A Shadow of Treason (Chronicles of the Spanish Civil War By Tricia Goyer – Lavons.co.uk and modern economy was made This is based upon the audio download from www.audible.com Narrated by David DrummondWow What a book Everything you wanted to know about slave ships, the business of slavery, and.This book detailed the whole sordid story of slavery as a business machine and its mass production of human cargo as a commodity The perspective of everyone connected to the slave ship is detailed There are stories from the captains, the merchants, the crew members, and the slaves themselves all with their un This is based upon the audio download from www.audible.com Narrated by David DrummondWow What a book Everything you wanted to know about slave ships, the business of slavery, and.This book detailed the whole sordid story of slavery as a business machine and its mass production of human cargo as a commodity The perspective of everyone connected to the slave ship is detailed There are stories from the captains, the merchants, the crew members, and the slaves themselves all with their unique viewpoints of their situations.It was remarkable to learn of the resistance put up by the slaves Many slaves continually fought their captivity by choosing to commit suicide through starvation or by throwing themselves overboard As suicide resulted in a loss of profits, actions were taken to ensure the health of their product Netting was set up around the ship to prevent slaves from jumping off the ship and those refusing to eat were gruesomely force fed.Insurrection occurred on 1 in 10 ships and resulted in torture and murder of those responsible Discipline as a deterrent was frequent aboard the slave ships Man s inhumanity toward man in these cases were stomach churning Death among slaves and crew were common and simply viewed as collateral damage The images of bodies either dead, as suicide, or as a form of torture being thrown overboard still haunts me As the remoras attach themselves to the sharks, the sharks attach themselves to the slave ships and instantly devour anything that falls into the water The thought of that form of death still gives me the chills.There was a quote in the book from William Wilberforce an English social reformer and abolitionist that sums it all up for me, So much misery condensed in so little room isthan the human imagination has ever before conceived This was my first experience with this reader and I have to say I was very impressed Many readers have the strangest inflections that always take some time to get used to David Drummond s reading of the book was clear, mellifluous and pleasant Both the content and the narration make this a worthy listen or read I m developing a science fiction novel about slavery called Humanity s Fall The basic concept is Twelve Years a Slave meets Star Trek and follows the ordeal of one woman ripped from her brownstone in Brooklyn and thrust into the belly of a ship to be sold on the other side of the galaxy The research for this book includes several sources exploring the impact of the Middle Passage including well known works like Rootsand Amistad togeneral books like The African Slave Trade and Still I Ris I m developing a science fiction novel about slavery called Humanity s Fall The basic concept is Twelve Years a Slave meets Star Trek and follows the ordeal of one woman ripped from her brownstone in Brooklyn and thrust into the belly of a ship to be sold on the other side of the galaxy The research for this book includes several sources exploring the impact of the Middle Passage including well known works like Rootsand Amistad togeneral books like The African Slave Trade and Still I Rise But as I get ready to write the first draft of Humanity s Fall, I think the book Slave Ship A Human History by Marcus Rediker will have the most impact on my story.Slave Ship looks at the mechanism of African slavery the ships and men who captured, bought, confined, tortured, killed and sold millions of people over the course of three centuries It explores in depth the functioning of the ship, examining the vehicle of the Middle Passage from several viewpoints The slave ship is seen as An investment for speculative European businessmen A debt prison for unwary sailors A marketplace for Africans selling slaves A prison for Africans captured A cemetery for slaves and crew killed in the journey A factory for the creation of slaves A battleground for slave inter slave conflict and collective rebellion An incubator for the concept of race A communal space for the creation of shared kinship A symbol of evil for abolitionistsRediker breaks down the Middle Passage in stages, showing how ships were commissioned and purchased, how captains and crews were formed, the process of buying people, attempting to simultaneously break their spirit but keep their bodies intact for sale, the successful and unsuccessful attempts to escape, overthrow or commit suicide and the complex social relationships spending months on the ship would create By drawing a historical and narrative thread from the people most distant from the process who gained the most wealth to the people most suffered the most intimate pain and lost the most,Slave Ship makes an argument for the ship itself to be one of the most influential and at the same time most ignored elements of social development in America.I read this book during the surge in media coverage over unarmed black men being killed in various parts of the country and the groundswell of racism playing out in various levels of society In light of this reality and against the backdrop of building my own novel, I began to see parallels between our own time and the collective experience of the slave ship It was easy to see the bankers and billionaires as the distant businessmen, too far removed from the process to have any interest in it beyond their profit The police became the sailors and reluctant prison guards The minority communities become the slaves and the incubator, factory, marketplace and communal space of the ship became the spaces we inhabit now, on and offline The ship came to represent so much of the American experience, it became easy, perhaps clich d, to imagine America as a slave ship we are all trapped on Slave Shipwill have a lasting impact on me, not just for the inspiration it provides for my work, but in the way I perceive the world I live in.Have fun.Gamal It s a little hard to love a book whose main objective is to painstakingly detail the extent of human cruelty and terror in the slave trade, especially when those details are revealingly extensive But this is a riveting historiography.What I suspected I d get going in was a good ethnography of the experience of the enslaved On this score, it did as well as could be hoped What I hoped for was insight on the economics of the slave trade, and the book came through there too But it s at its best It s a little hard to love a book whose main objective is to painstakingly detail the extent of human cruelty and terror in the slave trade, especially when those details are revealingly extensive But this is a riveting historiography.What I suspected I d get going in was a good ethnography of the experience of the enslaved On this score, it did as well as could be hoped What I hoped for was insight on the economics of the slave trade, and the book came through there too But it s at its best in describing the fate of the common sailor, whose situation might even be as wretched as any other aspect of the trade.I was warned that this would be a hard book to read And it is But not simply because of the lack of morality and humanity, the misery and sadism What it really does is portray clearly how the system itself was by necessity one of terror Underlying everything is a general implication of capitalism, or at least an unregulated capitalism Merchants both in England and on the coast of Africa sought profits Ship captains had to follow their own monetary incentives and enforce their own laws And the fates of the sailors and slaves were almost by rule grim or fatal as a result By the end of the book, words such as terror and slaughterhouse and dungeon seem understated.A great book Although I may have to read something a littlecheerful now Full of intriguing detail of ship mechanics and voyage logistics, Rediker has crafted an extraordinary account of the technology that underpinned the trade in humans His vignettes of first person experiences as merchant, Captain, Mate, trader, sailor and jailor are terrifying in their matter of fact acceptance of the daily horror For instance, who knew that ships built up their rails, so as to hang nets to thwart suicidal captives from jumping overboard Sometimes the profits were so enticing, Full of intriguing detail of ship mechanics and voyage logistics, Rediker has crafted an extraordinary account of the technology that underpinned the trade in humans His vignettes of first person experiences as merchant, Captain, Mate, trader, sailor and jailor are terrifying in their matter of fact acceptance of the daily horror For instance, who knew that ships built up their rails, so as to hang nets to thwart suicidal captives from jumping overboard Sometimes the profits were so enticing, sloops that could carry only 30 captives made the voyage At times, it seems like the slave trade was a kind of gold rush, luring would be capitalists over the moral line, as surely as they crossed the Tropic of Cancer This was a very painful read While we all know the slave ship middle passage was a horror, this book really goes into excruciating detail like you couldn t possibly imagine Something that makes it pretty readable is that the author tells stories of particular people people who kept journals, so you follow along the experience from all different perspectives the sailors, the captains, those who were deeply involved in the purchase sale, and the slaves themselves There s also some really grea This was a very painful read While we all know the slave ship middle passage was a horror, this book really goes into excruciating detail like you couldn t possibly imagine Something that makes it pretty readable is that the author tells stories of particular people people who kept journals, so you follow along the experience from all different perspectives the sailors, the captains, those who were deeply involved in the purchase sale, and the slaves themselves There s also some really great historical analysis Something that stands out in my mind is how all those involved in the slave trade, through their diaries and opinion pieces they wrote, they all felt they had some christian moral justification for it, or at least told themselves that It s common knowledge that high ranking tribal members in West Africa profited from slaving and sold their own people, and those involved in the slave trade used this as justification for what they were doing i.e we re saving them from themselves I was really impressed with the level of detail this author went into in analyzing why how that happened from the other side, understanding the tribal relationships it s not quite as simple as these heartless savage people sold their own.Ultimately this book demonstrates that racial identity boundaries in the US Carribean was essentially invented during the middle passage, and this book describes in detail the complex storm of social economic just plain horrific factors that established race It was a really amazing, but difficult, read Marcus Rediker is very quick to place the blame for the international slave trade on Europeans He discusses with brutal detail the devastation caused by the slave trade whether on the lives of the Africans, the captains, the sailors, merchants, the insurers What he merely touches upon is that the slave trade happened because of the complicity of the African tribal leaders and merchants If the Africans did not promote slavery for their own greed and or tribal revenge, would the Black slave Marcus Rediker is very quick to place the blame for the international slave trade on Europeans He discusses with brutal detail the devastation caused by the slave trade whether on the lives of the Africans, the captains, the sailors, merchants, the insurers What he merely touches upon is that the slave trade happened because of the complicity of the African tribal leaders and merchants If the Africans did not promote slavery for their own greed and or tribal revenge, would the Black slave trade have existed to the degree in which it did I would love to read a book that focuses on what the Africans did to promote and sustain slavery.Rediker recognizes the power of the abolitionist movement He also realizes that many white Europeans didn t care about the humanity of African slaves They did care about the harsh treatment of young white sailors Is it possible that the anti slavery movement in England would not have succeeded if the harsh daily life of a sailor on a slave ship was not part of the entire abolitionist propaganda story Rediker proposes that the slave ship was the first real capitalist enterprise This profit making corporation made the captain, sailors, traders, and the slaves less than human.I found the fact that slave ships could stay in a port in Africa for months before the captain got enough slaves to make the trip worth the cargo During this time of gathering the cargo, sailors would die of starvation and disease or escape the ship What a goddamned amazing and horrifying book to read Right off the bat, Rediker has us in a canoe with enslaved Africans traveling toward one of the waiting European many masted sea worthy vessels, also called a Guineaman Guineaman because, Guinea was an old school piece of British coin, and the West African coast being called the Guinea Coast among other horribly derogative terms was extremely lucrative to white merchants who dealt in human commodities.Rediker s book looks primarily at th What a goddamned amazing and horrifying book to read Right off the bat, Rediker has us in a canoe with enslaved Africans traveling toward one of the waiting European many masted sea worthy vessels, also called a Guineaman Guineaman because, Guinea was an old school piece of British coin, and the West African coast being called the Guinea Coast among other horribly derogative terms was extremely lucrative to white merchants who dealt in human commodities.Rediker s book looks primarily at the British and America piece of this, with a ghastly and incredibly researched focus on the slave ship itself.And he doesn t start from the point where the Africans are already enslaved He looked at the kingdoms that profiteered off the sale of their countrymen and women even as they didn t probably understand the horror they were condemning other Africans to as well as everyday Africans who were rounded up, sometimes whole villages taken by force, and sold directly into the slave trade, thus building globalized labor This was the start of global capitalism There s so much in this book Rediker looks at the life on board a slave ship from multiple perspectives the enslaved Africans, the sailors, and the captains Something I had not heard of before was that merchants, in order to getprofit, would work out details with captains where they would treat their sailors horribly during the Middle Passage Once in port, these sailors were usually in horrible condition with injuries, sickness, and mostly dehydration and starvation In some cases, as these ships sailed across the Atlantic, whole crews would die off Before that happened, the captain would order the enslaved Africans out of the hold to learn how to sail by the very sailors that would be left on the docks or die during the Middle Passage Captains would sometimes come down hard on some sailors bullying and brutalizing them Once in port, they might not want to return with home with the captain and would forfeit their shares of pay Thusfor the merchant and the captain.Obviously, insurrection was always a possibility, and so captain and crew had to be mindful of the enslaved When insurrections happened and were not successful, ringleaders were horribly tortured before being fed to sharks that swam with the slave ships across the ocean In cases where the insurrection was successful, the captain and crew might be fed to sharks or locked away, and if the Africans were able to pick up sailing, commandeer the boat and head back home or find a safe community Some became pirates In other cases, if no one knew how to sail, the ship would be adrift slowly killing the victors with dehydration and starvation Unfuckingreal Rediker humanized Africans before they were enslaved and that was key In my history classes in elementary school, we were never taught about the resistance nor that slaves were self determining people with their own lives before they were brutally and maliciously taken in the night and enslaved.One last amazing thing about this book, but I could go on, is that during the Middle Passage, enslaved Africans became black and the crew and captain became white even though the people on a slave ship might be from all over West Africa and not even speak the same language and sailors might be black and white These race distinctions were apart of the dehumanizing process for the Africans However, Rediker tells us that while the enslaved Africans lost their kin and tribal affiliations, new ways of communication and resistance were born And that legacy continues through today Fascinating, gripping, heart breaking, stomach turning, anger inducing, but an incredible history of resistance, rebellion, and insurrection A must MUST read for every single person out there Now I need to catch up with the other two books he published since this came out Read Rediker Please Like many other overwhelming catastrophes the Holocaust, AIDS, the persistence of poverty America s history as a slave owning nation is so hard to look at and examine deeply that we often shy away from any serious consideration of it.But this is a book that could overcome that reluctance in many, because it paints a very human history of the British and American slave trade in Africa without resorting to polemic or a dry recitation of the facts.Marcus Rediker, a history professor at the Un Like many other overwhelming catastrophes the Holocaust, AIDS, the persistence of poverty America s history as a slave owning nation is so hard to look at and examine deeply that we often shy away from any serious consideration of it.But this is a book that could overcome that reluctance in many, because it paints a very human history of the British and American slave trade in Africa without resorting to polemic or a dry recitation of the facts.Marcus Rediker, a history professor at the University of Pittsburgh, has decided to concentrate on the slave ship of the title, but in doing so, he really ends up exploring the five groups who were most involved in the ownership and operation of these ships slave merchants, captains and their officers, the seamen, the African slave traffickers, and the slaves themselves.Dr Rediker makes a convincing case that the slave trade actually helped to create the very notion of white people and black people Before it emerged, most Africans knew each other as members of different tribes and kinship groups, with hundreds of separate languages, customs and home territories In a similar way, the ordinary seamen of the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries were truly a motley crew, made up largely of sailors from the British isles and then the American colonies, but mixing in many other Europeans, some blacks and some Asians Only when they were put in the position of having to serve as both sailors and jailers for a captured mass of Africans did they become a generalized group of white men and only then did the slaves become melded into blacks Using his intensive research into British Parliamentary records, ship logs, written memoirs and other sources, Dr Rediker tells one achingly human story after another to portray what happened to the captured Africans from the time they were seized until they arrived at their destinations, how the sailors were mistreated and in turn mistreated the slaves, how brutal the ships captains were and the economic and other motives that drove them to frequent use of whips, thumbscrews, and worse, and how most slave merchants worked hard to distance themselves from the pain and agony of their trade by categorizing the slaves as numbers in a ledger, or convincing themselves that they were actually introducing Africans to a better way of life.The story contains many surprises along the way One is just how hard and how often slaves worked at freeing themselves, whether it was repeated insurrections on board to mass suicides Another was the way that Africans often thrown together from many different tribes and territories formed intensely close bonds on the ships, and how the survivors would tell their children henceforth to call their shipmates aunt and uncle if they saw them in the future And a third is the impact that one drawing had on the abolition of the slave trade in the early 1800s the careful schematic of The Brooke, showing the way it packedthan 400 slaves below decks.This is a chilling story and one that ought to raise serious and ongoing questions about how much America owes the people whose ancestors were brought to this nation in this way, and whose free labor enriched millions of other people and created fortunes that persist to this day.If you want to read one book that gives you a sense of the economics, sociology, anthropology and sheer human tragedy of the African slave trade, you could do no better than this THE HUMAN FACTOR IN AN INHUMAN TRADE The Slave Ship itself is the focus of Marcus Redikers well written and thoughtful book on the British and American slave trade of the 18th Century the ships themselves, the people who owned them, their captains, officers and ordinary sailors aswell as the enslaved Africans The picture that the book paints is detailed and vivid covering everything from the construction of the Slave ships, to their manning, the voyage out from Britain loaded with trade goods, THE HUMAN FACTOR IN AN INHUMAN TRADE The Slave Ship itself is the focus of Marcus Redikers well written and thoughtful book on the British and American slave trade of the 18th Century the ships themselves, the people who owned them, their captains, officers and ordinary sailors aswell as the enslaved Africans The picture that the book paints is detailed and vivid covering everything from the construction of the Slave ships, to their manning, the voyage out from Britain loaded with trade goods, the time spent off Africa buying up slaves and the middle passage to the West Indies and mainland America.Rediker captures the experiences of all those involved from a variety of sources ships logs, autobiography, the anti slavery societies, testomony to parliament The experiences of the enslaved Africans whose journey often started deep within the continent, to capture and sale by their fellow Africans, collaborators in the noxious trade Their experience on the ships, the brutality of the disciplinary regime and frequent resistance to enslavement are illuminated in countless examples that Rediker generalises into persistant themes The ordinary sailors lot is put across well, from how they were recruited, their treatment at the hands of the ships captain and his officers, the effect the various stages of the trade had on them, and the risks they faced Once the cargo of slaves was eventually sold in the Americas and the ships loaded with commodities for the final leg of the journey back to Britain a proportion of the crew seem to have been regarded as surplus, the high manning levels that were required for a cargo of slaves were no longer necessary They frequently seem to have been left in the Americas, no longer needed and very seldom paid an earlier ages flexible labour market.An interesting and readable book that writes of the slave trade from a different perspective, there are no tables of slaves shipped, imports or exports many other books already cover that important angle of the trade only the human experience of the countless people who participated in the slave trade and those who were themselves the commodities of that trade Rediker describes this experience in general terms, but it is the anecdotal accounts that give the general experience a vivid presence


About the Author: Marcus Rediker

Marcus Rediker is Distinguished Professor of Atlantic History at the University of Pittsburgh and Senior Research Fellow at the Coll ge d tudes mondiales in Paris He is the author of numerous prize winning books, including The Many Headed Hydra with Peter Linebaugh , The Slave Ship, and The Amistad Rebellion He produced the award winning documentary film Ghosts of Amistad Tony Buba, director , about how the Amistad Mutiny of 1839 lives on today in popular memory among the people of Sierra Leone.


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